We interrupt our broadcast for a brief video of Mr. Gregory Pike and his pet dog, cat, and rat.  Mr. Pike’s animals live enviable harmony with one another, and he hopes that, perhaps, people who witness their friendship will take away the message that humans, too, can coexist.  Says Mr. Pike, ”I make everybody happy, and in return it makes me happy.  Now if that ain’t comfort, nothing is.”

hspdigitallibrary:

Draft of an invitation to a fierce abolitionist wedding: Angelina Grimké and Theodore Dwight Weld were to be married at Grimké’s sister’s home at 1330 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, on May 14th, 1838. It requests the readers’ “presence, sympathy, and prayers” (!), and shows us some Quentin Blake-esque depictions of the “sisters” the invitation was addressed to.
From Ken Finkel over at the City Archives blog:
“The wedding was designed to demonstrate, challenge and irritate. Grimké  ‘was getting married in a manner calculated to shock and dismay the pillars of Charleston society, among whom she had been raised,’ wrote Gerda Lerner. She meant for it to be ‘a motley assembly of white and black, high and low.’ (Sarah Grimké noted that among the guests were ‘several colored persons…among them two liberated slaves, who formerly belonged to our father.’) After a brief, homemade, and ad hoc ceremony, during which Weld denounced traditional marriage vows and Grimké refused to include the word ‘obey,’ ‘a colored Presbyterian minister then prayed…followed by a white one,’ possibly Rev. Furness, who lived at 11 Belmont Row. The ‘certificate was then read by William Lloyd Garrison, and was signed by the company.’ Guests then shared good wishes and a wedding cake baked with ‘free sugar’–grown, harvested and manufactured without slave labor.”
I would recommend reading this whole blog post for a great portrait of the Grimké-Welds. 

hspdigitallibrary:

Draft of an invitation to a fierce abolitionist wedding: Angelina Grimké and Theodore Dwight Weld were to be married at Grimké’s sister’s home at 1330 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, on May 14th, 1838. It requests the readers’ “presence, sympathy, and prayers” (!), and shows us some Quentin Blake-esque depictions of the “sisters” the invitation was addressed to.

From Ken Finkel over at the City Archives blog:

The wedding was designed to demonstrate, challenge and irritate. Grimké  ‘was getting married in a manner calculated to shock and dismay the pillars of Charleston society, among whom she had been raised,’ wrote Gerda Lerner. She meant for it to be ‘a motley assembly of white and black, high and low.’ (Sarah Grimké noted that among the guests were ‘several colored persons…among them two liberated slaves, who formerly belonged to our father.’) After a brief, homemade, and ad hoc ceremony, during which Weld denounced traditional marriage vows and Grimké refused to include the word ‘obey,’ ‘a colored Presbyterian minister then prayed…followed by a white one,’ possibly Rev. Furness, who lived at 11 Belmont Row. The ‘certificate was then read by William Lloyd Garrison, and was signed by the company.’ Guests then shared good wishes and a wedding cake baked with ‘free sugar’–grown, harvested and manufactured without slave labor.”

I would recommend reading this whole blog post for a great portrait of the Grimké-Welds. 

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

The Digital Public Library of America turns one year old, today. Happy birthday to us!
Julian Walker Morton, Jr. blowing out birthday candles, ca. 1940. Morton, Hugh M. North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library. North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. 
Glendale National Charity League ball, 1958. Special Collections, Doheny Memorial Library, Libraries, University of Southern California. 
Jeff Mercer’s 6th birthday party, 1950s. M002_3_18-3, Johnny and Ginger Mercer Papers, Popular Music and Culture Collection, Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library. Digital Library of Georgia. 
Coach Red Sanders birthday, 1958. Special Collections, Doheny Memorial Library, Libraries, University of Southern California. 
Group of African American women and men gathered around a birthday cake, Los Angeles, ca. circa 1951-1960. Charlotta Bass/California Eagle Photograph Collection, Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research, Los Angeles. 
President Franklin D. Roosevelt Receives a Birthday Cake in the Oval Office, White House, ca. 01/27/1942. Franklin D. Roosevelt Library. National Archives and Records Administration. 
Mildred’s birthday, February 1987. Morton, Hugh M. North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library. North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. 
Henderson birthday, December 12, 1896. Forrest, J. Thomas. East Carolina University. North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. 
Girl Scouts’ birthday, 1952. Special Collections, Doheny Memorial Library, Libraries, University of Southern California. 

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

The Digital Public Library of America turns one year old, today. Happy birthday to us!

  1. Julian Walker Morton, Jr. blowing out birthday candles, ca. 1940. Morton, Hugh M. North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library. North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. 
  2. Glendale National Charity League ball, 1958. Special Collections, Doheny Memorial Library, Libraries, University of Southern California. 
  3. Jeff Mercer’s 6th birthday party, 1950s. M002_3_18-3, Johnny and Ginger Mercer Papers, Popular Music and Culture Collection, Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library. Digital Library of Georgia. 
  4. Coach Red Sanders birthday, 1958. Special Collections, Doheny Memorial Library, Libraries, University of Southern California. 
  5. Group of African American women and men gathered around a birthday cake, Los Angeles, ca. circa 1951-1960. Charlotta Bass/California Eagle Photograph Collection, Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research, Los Angeles. 
  6. President Franklin D. Roosevelt Receives a Birthday Cake in the Oval Office, White House, ca. 01/27/1942. Franklin D. Roosevelt Library. National Archives and Records Administration. 
  7. Mildred’s birthday, February 1987. Morton, Hugh M. North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library. North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. 
  8. Henderson birthday, December 12, 1896. Forrest, J. Thomas. East Carolina University. North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. 
  9. Girl Scouts’ birthday, 1952. Special Collections, Doheny Memorial Library, Libraries, University of Southern California. 

crossettlibrary:

In honor of Charlie Chaplin’s birthday, born today in 1889, full name Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin, KBE. Here he is receiving an honorary Oscar at the 44th Academy Awards in 1972. Note, the video has been edited for viewer convenience: it leaves out the TWELVE-MINUTE STANDING OVATION he received.

[Image: Graphic similar to the top of a Wikipedia entry on the Encyclopedia Britannica, featuring what seems to be an older version of the encyclopedia, with inset text reading “Encyclopedia Britannica is a compendium of reference books containing the most up-to-date information about the U.S.S.R.”  Lower in the graphic is the Wikipedia logo and the text “TL;DR Wikipedia.”]
lib-tech-in-the-tardis:

Exactly why weeding is important…

Especially since they seem to have used an outdated version of the Encyclopedia Britannica to generate their post!  After all, recent editions of the Britannica clearly label it as an historical political entity.  So in a sense, yes, it certainly does contain the most up to date info on the USSR—and that’s a good thing!

It’s important to evaluate one’s sources for timeliness, accuracy, and above all, bias.  For all that Wikipedia’s proponents insist that its crowdsourced editing and research are every bit as valid and reliable as standard library sources and professional research skills, it makes their argument seem much weaker when they need to engage in deliberate obfuscation in order to get their point across.

[Image: Graphic similar to the top of a Wikipedia entry on the Encyclopedia Britannica, featuring what seems to be an older version of the encyclopedia, with inset text reading “Encyclopedia Britannica is a compendium of reference books containing the most up-to-date information about the U.S.S.R.”  Lower in the graphic is the Wikipedia logo and the text “TL;DR Wikipedia.”]

lib-tech-in-the-tardis:

Exactly why weeding is important…

Especially since they seem to have used an outdated version of the Encyclopedia Britannica to generate their post!  After all, recent editions of the Britannica clearly label it as an historical political entity.  So in a sense, yes, it certainly does contain the most up to date info on the USSR—and that’s a good thing!

It’s important to evaluate one’s sources for timeliness, accuracy, and above all, bias.  For all that Wikipedia’s proponents insist that its crowdsourced editing and research are every bit as valid and reliable as standard library sources and professional research skills, it makes their argument seem much weaker when they need to engage in deliberate obfuscation in order to get their point across.

(Source: tldrwikipedia, via librarymoments)

oupacademic:

Happy birthday, Charlie Chaplin!
The Kid, The Circus, The Great Dictator, Limelight … these are only a small selection of Charlie Chaplin’s most iconic films. Find out more about his acting and producing career in Who’s Who.
Image: Essanay Studios (British Film Institute). Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

oupacademic:

Happy birthday, Charlie Chaplin!

The Kid, The Circus, The Great Dictator, Limelight … these are only a small selection of Charlie Chaplin’s most iconic films. Find out more about his acting and producing career in Who’s Who.

Image: Essanay Studios (British Film Institute). Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Getting ready for Poem in A Pocket Day on April 24th. Find poems by your favorite poets throughout the library and take one with you to share with your friends.

Getting ready for Poem in A Pocket Day on April 24th. Find poems by your favorite poets throughout the library and take one with you to share with your friends.

bookpatrol:

"Be all you can be. Read." – Peter Max’s 1969 National Library Week poster

bookpatrol:

"Be all you can be. Read." – Peter Max’s 1969 National Library Week poster

(via bhampublib)

[Image: Roman copy of Greek bust of Sappho.  Text overlay reads: “…for when I look at you, even a moment, no speaking is left in me” and “Sappho, c 600 BC”]

A line from Sappho 31, translated by Anne Carson.  Despite Sappho's tremendous acclaim in her own era and several centuries beyond, Sappho 31 is one of only four complete or nearly-complete poems by her that remains; the rest are fragments, snippets of handwriting on decaying papyrus, unearthed by archaeologists from ancient rubbish piles.

[Image: Roman copy of Greek bust of Sappho.  Text overlay reads: “…for when I look at you, even a moment, no speaking is left in me” and “Sappho, c 600 BC”]

A line from Sappho 31, translated by Anne Carson.  Despite Sappho's tremendous acclaim in her own era and several centuries beyond, Sappho 31 is one of only four complete or nearly-complete poems by her that remains; the rest are fragments, snippets of handwriting on decaying papyrus, unearthed by archaeologists from ancient rubbish piles.

thehystericalsociety:

"Fast friends passing the gate of Sleepy Land" - Underwood & Underwood Stereoview - 1906 - (Via)

Shhh—Cute Animal Friday is taking a nap.

thehystericalsociety:

"Fast friends passing the gate of Sleepy Land" - Underwood & Underwood Stereoview - 1906 - (Via)

Shhh—Cute Animal Friday is taking a nap.