othmeralia:

As a big Boardwalk Empire fan I am both excited and a little sad by the final season premier today.  To get myself ready for the new season I mined the Othmer Library’s varied collection and found some gems highlighting the perils of drinking alcohol.  This week I present to you the beautifully illustrated The Tippler’s Vow by Lee Fairchild with 26 original dry-points by Jean Paleologue.  This book predates Prohibition but I imagine it would have been popular with the followers of the Temperance movement.

othmeralia:

"Stewardesses rate the staining accidents incidental to the handling of children second only to the preparing and serving of food and drink as a hazard to the maintenance of their uniforms."
While this 1958 advertisement/article lauding the use of Scotchgard on airline stewardesses’ uniforms reeks of sexism it is fun to note that Scotchgard was co-invented by a woman chemist named Patsy Sherman. Patsy was hired by 3M Company in 1952 when there were few females in the chemistry field. BTW today is Patsy’s birthday! 
Image of page 66-67 of American Fabrics, 1958.

othmeralia:

"Stewardesses rate the staining accidents incidental to the handling of children second only to the preparing and serving of food and drink as a hazard to the maintenance of their uniforms."

While this 1958 advertisement/article lauding the use of Scotchgard on airline stewardesses’ uniforms reeks of sexism it is fun to note that Scotchgard was co-invented by a woman chemist named Patsy Sherman. Patsy was hired by 3M Company in 1952 when there were few females in the chemistry field. BTW today is Patsy’s birthday! 

Image of page 66-67 of American Fabrics, 1958.

[Image: Page one of EC Comics’ science-fiction story “Judgment Day,” in which a helmeted Earth astronaut arrives on Cybrinia to evaluate their readiness to join the Galactic Republic.  Source]

EC Comics ran stories so shocking, so appalling, that well-meaning parents, psychologists, teachers, and other so-called experts on the youthful mind declared their titles, as well as others in the medium, to be the vilest influence on children of the day.  Beheadings, stranglings, ladies in negligees, ladies in negligees being strangled or beheaded, tentacled space beasts, zombies, zombie narrators, mobsters, gunplay—you name it, EC published it.
The uproar became so problematic that the industry—much like the film industry in the 1930s—decided to police itself, creating the Comics Code Authority.  Poor old EC did their best to abide by the Code, but the last straw came in 1956, with a reprint of one of their earlier stories, called “Judgment Day.”  Somehow, this story had slipped by the industry censors a couple of years prior, but in 1956 it was deemed so inappropriate, so shocking, that the Code office demanded that its dramatic ending be altered.  After several attempts to reason with censors (and at least one acrimonious phone call involving language inappropriate for this weblog), the noble pioneers at EC said “d**n the torpedoes,” albeit sans asterisks, and published “Judgment Day” unchanged.  It was the last comic they would ever publish; immediately thereafter, they dropped their comics lines to focus on Mad magazine.

Just what was so shocking, so horrifying, about “Judgment Day”?  What about it outraged the censors even more than terrified ladies in negligees being beheaded by tentacled zombie narrators?  Find out by visiting our Banned Books research guide, or read the entire comic here, courtesy of Mars Will Send No More.

[Image: Page one of EC Comics’ science-fiction story “Judgment Day,” in which a helmeted Earth astronaut arrives on Cybrinia to evaluate their readiness to join the Galactic Republic.  Source]

EC Comics ran stories so shocking, so appalling, that well-meaning parents, psychologists, teachers, and other so-called experts on the youthful mind declared their titles, as well as others in the medium, to be the vilest influence on children of the day.  Beheadings, stranglings, ladies in negligees, ladies in negligees being strangled or beheaded, tentacled space beasts, zombies, zombie narrators, mobsters, gunplay—you name it, EC published it.

The uproar became so problematic that the industry—much like the film industry in the 1930s—decided to police itself, creating the Comics Code Authority.  Poor old EC did their best to abide by the Code, but the last straw came in 1956, with a reprint of one of their earlier stories, called “Judgment Day.”  Somehow, this story had slipped by the industry censors a couple of years prior, but in 1956 it was deemed so inappropriate, so shocking, that the Code office demanded that its dramatic ending be altered.  After several attempts to reason with censors (and at least one acrimonious phone call involving language inappropriate for this weblog), the noble pioneers at EC said “d**n the torpedoes,” albeit sans asterisks, and published “Judgment Day” unchanged.  It was the last comic they would ever publish; immediately thereafter, they dropped their comics lines to focus on Mad magazine.

Just what was so shocking, so horrifying, about “Judgment Day”?  What about it outraged the censors even more than terrified ladies in negligees being beheaded by tentacled zombie narrators?  Find out by visiting our Banned Books research guide, or read the entire comic here, courtesy of Mars Will Send No More.

"

Pittsburg [Kansas]’s first librarian, Ella Buchanan, left her post more than 100 years ago to pursue her dream of becoming an artist.

She achieved it and then some: One of her sculptures became the face of the women’s suffrage movement; another was a gift to a U.S. president.

Now, a bit of Buchanan, including one of her sculptures, is back in the library and will remain there permanently thanks to a gift from her family, an anonymous benefactor, a local craftsman and some sleuthing by Bev Clarkson, Pittsburg library director.

"

Pittsburg’s first librarian became noted artist; sculpture, portrait to be put on permanent display" by Andra Bryan Stefanoni in the Joplin Globe, with another hat tip to AL Direct for the link (via womenoflibraryhistory)

pittspecialcollections:

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Washington on his way to Pittsburgh, Aged twenty. Creator: William Stott, (print), ca. 1754. Published by R. Magee, No. 45, Chestnut St., Philadelphia

George Washington is a name that will always have a home in American history books. His history in Pennsylvania though, is different and not always covered. In Pennsylvania, he was George Washington before he was GEORGE WASHINGTON; he was one soldier in the French and Indian War before he was Commander-In-Chief in the Revolutionary War; he was one guy who almost died and would have been forgotten instead of the First President of the United States, Founding Father of our country, to be always remembered in the American heart.

He was born February 22, 1732, in Westmoreland County, Virginia. When he was young, his father died, leaving Washington to look up to his brother Lawrence. Wanting to follow in his brother’s footsteps, Washington became an adjutant of the Virginia militia. One of his first assignments, in 1753, was to carry a letter to the French warning them to get out of the Ohio Valley because it was British territory. On this trip he met Tanacharisson, also called the Half-King, who was an important Seneca chief.

A journal of George Washington’s details this first expedition into the Ohio Country, October 1753 – January 1754:

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Other Washington artifacts that we have is this letter written in 1754 that document events leading up to the French and Indian war. In it, he announces the surrender of the fort “in the Forks of Monongahela.”

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Fast-forward several years, and Washington goes from one war to the next.

This letter of Washington’s dates 1777, during the American Revolution. His correspondence with General Hand concerns the state of our very own Fort Pitt. Washington recognizes the state of the garrison at Fort Pitt and the attitude of the neighboring inhabitants in furnishing assistance. He tells Hand that he can keep any Continental troops except those of the 8th Pennsylvania Regiment. Any members of this regiment are to be sent to Washington’s camp.

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This letter was written after the Battle of Germantown, which was technically a British victory but raised American spirits because they had almost won. Yet Washington and his men were still in the throes of war, as this letter was also written a little before the army settled at Valley Forge for the winter.

Even though this was a desperate time for George Washington, we all know how he pulled through, fought, won, and gained America her freedom. But, what if, back before the French and Indian War when he was just another soldier in Pennsylvania, what if he had died?

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Washington Crossing the Allegheny River with his guide, Christopher Gist October 31, 1753.

Christopher Gist, Washington’s guide, wrote in his Third Journal,

Saturday [December] 29 [1753].

We set out early, got to Alleghany, made a raft, and with much difficulty got over to an island, a little above Shannopin’s town. The Major [George Washington] having fallen in from off the raft, and my fingers frost-bitten, and the sun down, and very cold, we contented ourselves to encamp upon that island. It was deep water between us and the shore; but the cold did us some service, for in the morning it was frozen hard enough for us to pass over on the ice.

Washington wrote about the seriousness of the incident in his own journal: “But before we were Half Way over, we were jammed in the Ice, in such a Manner, that we expected every Moment our Raft to sink, and ourselves to perish.” 

George Washington would have become a mere footnote on the pages of history books instead of the main subject of scores of them. The highlight of his short career would have been delivering that letter to the French; indeed, all the “events leading up to the French and Indian War” that he was involved in may not have even been noted because there may not have been any French and Indian War to lead up to. And let’s not even think about how the Revolutionary War would have gone, not to mention America, democracy, freedom.

However, this might be too much responsibility to place on the shoulders of one man (even if he was six feet tall). Hopefully, even if one great man hadn’t been around, others would have stepped up instead. As we know well, the American spirit isn’t only to be found in one man or woman. But, this doesn’t mean we shouldn’t celebrate that American spirit when it is found.

Written by student employee, Lauren Galloway.

Works Cited:

McClung, Robert M. Young George Washington and the French and Indian War, 1753-1758. North Haven, CT: Linnet, 2002. Print.

Vickery, Paul. Washington: A Legacy of Leadership. Ed. Stephen Mansfield. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 2010. Print. The Generals.

 

[Images: Two gifs of Lucille Ball collapsing in joy when she realizes that she has kissed Bill Holden.]

Well to be fair, William Holden was not only one of the 20th century’s finest actors, but pretty handsome, in a 1950s kind of way:

The CS Library actually has a nice sample of his work, including the amazing Sunset Boulevard.

(Source: windy-soul, via bellecs)

sallybakedchocolatecakes:

Blixa Bargeld 1985/ pic:Midori Tsukagoshi/music life

I’m not certain I can come up with a viable excuse for reblogging Blixa Bargeld, since he’s not holding a book or engaged in information-related activities.  Er, why not read Assimilate: A Critical History of Industrial Music, which certainly discusses his band Einstürzende Neubauten, albeit in not nearly enough depth?

sallybakedchocolatecakes:

Blixa Bargeld 1985/ pic:Midori Tsukagoshi/music life

I’m not certain I can come up with a viable excuse for reblogging Blixa Bargeld, since he’s not holding a book or engaged in information-related activities.  Er, why not read Assimilate: A Critical History of Industrial Music, which certainly discusses his band Einstürzende Neubauten, albeit in not nearly enough depth?

(via pixieboy01)

wehadfacesthen:

Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong in the recording studio, 1956

wehadfacesthen:

Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong in the recording studio, 1956

[Image: Color photo of two cosplayers, one a heavily-armed and masked warrior with an improbable sword, the other a dark elf with a bare midriff.]
oupacademic:

More than 90% of high school students in the USA play videogames, and a significant percentage favour role-playing games above all others. How much do these children owe to the original Dungeons and Dragons books from the 1970s?
Image: Cosplay and World of Warcraft. CC-BY-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

[Image: Color photo of two cosplayers, one a heavily-armed and masked warrior with an improbable sword, the other a dark elf with a bare midriff.]

oupacademic:

More than 90% of high school students in the USA play videogames, and a significant percentage favour role-playing games above all others. How much do these children owe to the original Dungeons and Dragons books from the 1970s?

Image: Cosplay and World of Warcraft. CC-BY-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

thecuedot:

Meet Peter, one of the professional projectionists who ran these machines and ones like them for thirty years. Here, he waits. Everything is all set to go. The film is threaded, the arclight is burning. The reel on the far machine is coming to an end. With only moments left before the screen goes black, Peter looks out the port glass window with his eyes fixed in the upper right hand corner of the screen, waiting for the cue dot. Once he sees the first cue dot, he’ll start the machine. At the second cue dot he’ll hit the #projection changeover pedal and the movie will continue on the new machine. Meanwhile, the audience notices nothing.

thecuedot:

Meet Peter, one of the professional projectionists who ran these machines and ones like them for thirty years. Here, he waits. Everything is all set to go. The film is threaded, the arclight is burning. The reel on the far machine is coming to an end. With only moments left before the screen goes black, Peter looks out the port glass window with his eyes fixed in the upper right hand corner of the screen, waiting for the cue dot. Once he sees the first cue dot, he’ll start the machine. At the second cue dot he’ll hit the #projection changeover pedal and the movie will continue on the new machine. Meanwhile, the audience notices nothing.

(via broadcastarchive-umd)