wnyc:

In the mid-1960s, photojournalist Ernest Cole set out to document life under apartheid in South Africa. He was arrested, and fled South Africa in 1966, and published House of Bondage in 1967. The NYU Grey Art Gallery is holding the first major show of his exhibitions, and we’ll be talking about the exhibit with Joseph Lelyveld.

(via awesomearchives)

magictransistor:

Assembly lines manufacturing of the RCA Victor 9JY (Bakelite Record Player), ca. 1948

magictransistor:

Assembly lines manufacturing of the RCA Victor 9JY (Bakelite Record Player), ca. 1948

(Source: phonojack.com, via broadcastarchive-umd)

What constitutes a “real” refugee?

oupacademic:

image

Katy Long argues that the real challenge when protecting “real” refugees is finding them amongst bogus asylum seekers

Image: New PNC headquarters in Goma, by MONUSCO Photos. CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

widenerlibrary:

This is a volume form the library of Count Riant, purchased for Harvard by Professor Archibald Cary Coolidge and his father J. Randolph Coolidge in 1898. At the time the Librarian, William Coolidge Lane, called this bequest “the most valuable which the Library has ever received”.

These photos show both the Count’s and the Library’s bookplates; the check out slip (last checked out 100 years ago); and an illustration from within the volume. This book, like many of the books from the Riant collection, is classed in the Old Widener ‘Crus’ classification, for books on the Crusades.

Professor Coolidge later became the library’s Director and oversaw the building of Widener Library.

cityoflondonlibraries:

The Virtue and Use of Coffee with regard to the Plague and other Infectious Distempers. 
Bradley said he could give up anytime he wanted, didn’t even like the taste. Then wrote this whole text in ten minutes after downing twelve cups before passing out in Mrs. Miggins’ pie shop. True Story.
Note: Our legal team (Bob) would like me to make clear this is not a true story.

cityoflondonlibraries:

The Virtue and Use of Coffee with regard to the Plague and other Infectious Distempers

Bradley said he could give up anytime he wanted, didn’t even like the taste. Then wrote this whole text in ten minutes after downing twelve cups before passing out in Mrs. Miggins’ pie shop. True Story.

Note: Our legal team (Bob) would like me to make clear this is not a true story.

(via smithsonianlibraries)

othmeralia:

A sea captain early in life, James Emerson of Willimansett, Massachusetts, went on to make key contributions to the turbine industry. Emerson established the Holyoke Testing Flume in Holyoke, MA, in 1870. Here he carried out tests of various water wheels. His tests in turn helped builders construct more efficient turbines. Emerson detailed his work with turbines in his Treatise Relative to the Testing of Water-Wheels and Machinery – the 4th edition of this book (published in 1892) is shown above.

Interestingly, Emerson didn’t confine his book solely to a discussion of turbines. Throughout the work, Emerson shared his feelings (sometimes quite passionately!) on a myriad of topics including:

  • The medical profession – if a doctor is to be called, it should only cost “twenty-five cents per visit” (p. 125)
  • Marriage - “The marriage laws are unequal and unjust…Marriage by equitable contract should produce equality and continued effort to please. Give both the same right to propose such partnership” (pp. 140-141)
  • Poetry - “For myself, admiration for poetry only comes as it touches my feelings, and it may be found in prose as well as in verse…” (p. 169)
  • Diet - “First, my diet has always been spare, at the same time I have invariably eaten anything that I have desired and at any time without any regard to regular hours, often at midnight or later if restless…Hot biscuit, hot doughnuts, pies of all kinds, puddings, strawberry short cakes, buckwheats, fruit, and a few of the ordinary vegetables constitute my ordinary meals, with hot tea or coffee, no liquor, beer, or tobacco in any form” (p. 173)
  • Prohibition - “Prohibition interferes with the rights of all, and with very doubtful effects” (p. 381)
  • Mind Reading - “Mind reading is now so generally accepted that I do not care to go into particulars in proof, though it would be easy to furnish positive evidence of the fact, and that it begins with the very young even before the child can talk” (p. 474)

[Image: B/w photo of a little Korean girl and a Turkish soldier reading an American comic book during the Korean War, 1951.  Photo by Carl Mydans, via Life.]

Part of a great article at Life's website about comics in American culture during the 1940s-1950s.

[Image: B/w photo of a little Korean girl and a Turkish soldier reading an American comic book during the Korean War, 1951.  Photo by Carl Mydans, via Life.]

Part of a great article at Life's website about comics in American culture during the 1940s-1950s.

cscclibrary:

[Image: Peach circle on blue and white patterned background, with graphics of raffle tickets scattered below.  Text reads, “Presenting our Banned Books Week raffle/Enter now!/It’s free!/Details below.”]
The CS Library and the college bookstore are working together to bring you fabulous prizes!  Enter now through September 30th for a gift basket that includes several popular banned books, plus useful bookstore merchandise.  There are multiple opportunities to enter—check out our Banned Books website for more information!

Only two more days to enter!

cscclibrary:

[Image: Peach circle on blue and white patterned background, with graphics of raffle tickets scattered below.  Text reads, “Presenting our Banned Books Week raffle/Enter now!/It’s free!/Details below.”]

The CS Library and the college bookstore are working together to bring you fabulous prizes!  Enter now through September 30th for a gift basket that includes several popular banned books, plus useful bookstore merchandise.  There are multiple opportunities to enter—check out our Banned Books website for more information!

Only two more days to enter!

statelibrarynsw:

This week we commemorate two milestones over on Flickr Commons.
First, September 30 is our sixth birthday on the Commons – we’ve been uploading selected images from our photographic collections to Flickr Commons since 2008. Now, we have almost 2 500 images, arranged into 100 thematic albums. 
Second, we’ve recently passed 20 million views of our images on Flickr Commons! That’s a lot! 
Thank you to everyone who has viewed, used, commented on and enjoyed our photographs. We love them, and it looks like you do too!
To celebrate, we’ll be sharing six of our most popular images from the Commons in a six day countdown to our September 30 birthday.
NUMBER FOUR:
A wet Angel Place, Sydney, 1930s / Sam Hood
This evocative photograph by Sam Hood shows Angel Place in Sydney in the 1930s. You’d be forgiven for thinking that Al Capone was about to step out of the shadows, but Sydney’s razor gangs were more active in the Surry Hills, Darlinghurst and Woolloomooloo areas than in the middle of town.
Sam Hood is one of the most prolific photographers represented in the Library’s photographic collections. As a freelance press photographer, who later moved into commercial photography, he photographed people, events and locations of all kinds, giving us a fantastic visual record of Sydney life in the 1930s and 40s.

statelibrarynsw:

This week we commemorate two milestones over on Flickr Commons.

First, September 30 is our sixth birthday on the Commons – we’ve been uploading selected images from our photographic collections to Flickr Commons since 2008. Now, we have almost 2 500 images, arranged into 100 thematic albums. 

Second, we’ve recently passed 20 million views of our images on Flickr Commons! That’s a lot! 

Thank you to everyone who has viewed, used, commented on and enjoyed our photographs. We love them, and it looks like you do too!

To celebrate, we’ll be sharing six of our most popular images from the Commons in a six day countdown to our September 30 birthday.

NUMBER FOUR:

A wet Angel Place, Sydney, 1930s / Sam Hood

This evocative photograph by Sam Hood shows Angel Place in Sydney in the 1930s. You’d be forgiven for thinking that Al Capone was about to step out of the shadows, but Sydney’s razor gangs were more active in the Surry Hills, Darlinghurst and Woolloomooloo areas than in the middle of town.

Sam Hood is one of the most prolific photographers represented in the Library’s photographic collections. As a freelance press photographer, who later moved into commercial photography, he photographed people, events and locations of all kinds, giving us a fantastic visual record of Sydney life in the 1930s and 40s.

Did you know that if you Google “tiny adorable fruit bat,” you get some delightful results?  The photo of tiny adorable fruit bats above, courtesy Incredible Bats, is proof.

Did you know that if you Google “tiny adorable fruit bat,” you get some delightful results?  The photo of tiny adorable fruit bats above, courtesy Incredible Bats, is proof.