challenger23:

How to use Photoshop to restore an old, faded photo
I wrote/gif’d a short ‘how-to’ piece for the dailydot, featuring techniques I used to fix this photo.

Before photos existed only as .jpgs, backed up on Flickr andFacebook and Imgur and in cheap portable hard drives, they were subject to the ravages of time. 
Prints only lasted so long. The negatives, from which they were originally made, were lost or destroyed. Saving these analog memories from their inevitable destruction can be as easy as a one-click desktop scanner, but sometimes the images have already suffered from damage. 
Software like Adobe Photoshop can breathe life back into faded photos—if you know how to do it right.

Read the rest —->

challenger23:

How to use Photoshop to restore an old, faded photo

I wrote/gif’d a short ‘how-to’ piece for the dailydot, featuring techniques I used to fix this photo.

Before photos existed only as .jpgs, backed up on Flickr andFacebook and Imgur and in cheap portable hard drives, they were subject to the ravages of time. 

Prints only lasted so long. The negatives, from which they were originally made, were lost or destroyed. Saving these analog memories from their inevitable destruction can be as easy as a one-click desktop scanner, but sometimes the images have already suffered from damage. 

Software like Adobe Photoshop can breathe life back into faded photos—if you know how to do it right.

Read the rest —->

Today is Poem in your Pocket Day. Carry a poem in your pocket and share with your friends.

Today is Poem in your Pocket Day. Carry a poem in your pocket and share with your friends.

nyhistory:

April 24, 1913: President Woodrow Wilson presses a button in the White House that illumines 80,000 lights in the Woolworth Building on its opening day; the so-called “Cathedral of Commerce" is then the tallest building in the world.  Men cleaning exterior of the Woolworth Building, detail of setback, side elevation at SE corner, ca. 1913. Photograph by Wurts Brothers. New-York Historical Society, Cass Gilbert Architectural Record Collection, PR 021. Image # 54746

nyhistory:

April 24, 1913: President Woodrow Wilson presses a button in the White House that illumines 80,000 lights in the Woolworth Building on its opening day; the so-called “Cathedral of Commerce" is then the tallest building in the world.

Men cleaning exterior of the Woolworth Building, detail of setback, side elevation at SE corner, ca. 1913. Photograph by Wurts Brothers. New-York Historical Society, Cass Gilbert Architectural Record Collection, PR 021. Image # 54746

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

On April 24, 1916, the Library of Congress was established in the United States Capitol. The first Library of Congress, approved by President John Adams, housed 3,000 volumes.
Library of Congress. North Hall, Entrance Pavilion.
“Embossed on front: “53545 Library of Congress. North Hall, Entrance Pavilion. Copyright, 1900, by Detroit Photographic Co.”“
Photograph from the William Henry Jackson Photochrom Collection, 1898-1905 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

On April 24, 1916, the Library of Congress was established in the United States Capitol. The first Library of Congress, approved by President John Adams, housed 3,000 volumes.

Library of Congress. North Hall, Entrance Pavilion.

Embossed on front: “53545 Library of Congress. North Hall, Entrance Pavilion. Copyright, 1900, by Detroit Photographic Co.”“

Photograph from the William Henry Jackson Photochrom Collection, 1898-1905 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.

[Images: Photos of paper pockets full of poems at various CS Library locations, as well as a poem at our Reference Desk.]

It’s Poem in Your Pocket Day, and visitors to the first and second floors of the CS Library today will find poetry around every corner.  Reference Librarian Lorena decorated our study and collating tables with hand-folded paper pockets containing great English-language poems by poets old and new.  Visitors are encouraged to stop and read, and to take a copy of a poem with them when they go!

If you miss Poem in Your Pocket Day, National Poetry Month will of course continue to be celebrated throughout the library for the duration of April.  Every day a new poem appears at our Reference Desk and at the study tables on the first floor!

[Image: Poster for CSCC’s production of Antigone.]

Theatre Columbus State presents Antigone–a Greek tragedy addressing issues and challenges we still face in today’s society.  First performed in 441 B.C., Antigone depicts the struggles to bury a young man who died fighting for the throne of Thebes. His sister, Antigone, insists on giving him proper funeral rites, in defiance of an order from the new king. Antigone must struggle to follow her own conscience, even if it causes civil disorder.  Antigone will be presented in the Nestor Hall Auditorium nightly at 8 p.m. from April 23 through the 26. There’s an additional 3 p.m. matinee on April 24. All performances are free. 

[Image: Poster for CSCC’s production of Antigone.]

Theatre Columbus State presents Antigone–a Greek tragedy addressing issues and challenges we still face in today’s society.  First performed in 441 B.C., Antigone depicts the struggles to bury a young man who died fighting for the throne of Thebes. His sister, Antigone, insists on giving him proper funeral rites, in defiance of an order from the new king. Antigone must struggle to follow her own conscience, even if it causes civil disorder.  Antigone will be presented in the Nestor Hall Auditorium nightly at 8 p.m. from April 23 through the 26. There’s an additional 3 p.m. matinee on April 24. All performances are free. 

(Source: cscc.edu)

farleysgranger:

Art of the Hollywood Fan Magazines

Picture-Play covers by Henry Clive

January — April 1923

Mary Miles Minter, Lila Lee, Pola Negri, Lois Wilson

(via kittypackards)

jenbekmanprojects:

In The Library by Tatsuro KiuchiPaired: Tatsuro Kiuchi + Charles Simic 
In the LibraryThere’s a book called "A Dictionary of Angels." No one has opened it in fifty years, I know, because when I did, The covers creaked, the pages Crumbled. There I discovered The angels were once as plentiful As species of flies. The sky at dusk Used to be thick with them. You had to wave both arms Just to keep them away. Now the sun is shining Through the tall windows. The library is a quiet place. Angels and gods huddled In dark unopened books. The great secret lies On some shelf Miss JonesPasses every day on her rounds. She’s very tall, so she keeps Her head tipped as if listening. The books are whispering. I hear nothing, but she does.Charles Simic

In celebration of National Poetry Month, we’re introducing a new series called Paired, which will feature a 20x200 edition alongside a poem selected by a team member, friend, or collector each day in April. Submissions are welcome! Please write us at hello@20x200.com.

jenbekmanprojects:

In The Library by Tatsuro Kiuchi

PairedTatsuro Kiuchi + Charles Simic 

In the Library

There’s a book called 

"A Dictionary of Angels." 
No one has opened it in fifty years, 
I know, because when I did, 
The covers creaked, the pages 
Crumbled. There I discovered 

The angels were once as plentiful 
As species of flies. 
The sky at dusk 
Used to be thick with them. 
You had to wave both arms 
Just to keep them away. 

Now the sun is shining 
Through the tall windows. 
The library is a quiet place. 
Angels and gods huddled 
In dark unopened books. 
The great secret lies 
On some shelf Miss Jones
Passes every day on her rounds. 

She’s very tall, so she keeps 
Her head tipped as if listening. 
The books are whispering. 
I hear nothing, but she does.

Charles Simic



In celebration of National Poetry Month, we’re introducing a new series called Paired, which will feature a 20x200 edition alongside a poem selected by a team member, friend, or collector each day in April. Submissions are welcome! Please write us at hello@20x200.com.

(via itakeupspace)

ancientart:

Ancient post-it notes!

romkids:

How often do you reach for a Post-It note? Maybe you’re making that to do list, or figuring out your groceries. But you know, what if you lived BEFORE Post-It notes or scrap paper? What would you use then?

In Thebes, where these examples are from, and across the Roman Empire, scraps of used and broken pottery would be used to scribble quick notes. These examples are called ostraka. Most of the ostraka that our conservators and curators are studying right now contain notes on taxes and granary receipts from the second century AD.

The notes are written in Greek script. Kay Sunahara, ROM archaeologist studying these pieces, described the Greek langage at the time as, “the lingua franca of the Mediterranean”. Greek was the most frequently used written language, used to help bridge the gap between speakers of different languages, much like English today.

The majority of these pieces we’re found and acquired in the early 1900’s by none other than ROM founder Charles T. Currelly.

So how are these scrap pieces of pottery useful to archaeology today? Are grocery lists really that vaulabe? For archaeologists, ostraka provide them with a great deal of information about the people who left these notes in the first place. Information such as what people were eating, trading for, in trouble for, and the prices of things, give us a unique look into those who lived far before us, in this case well over a thousand years ago.

Interestingly enough, it also shows us just how similar we are to those who lived long before. Everyone needs groceries, and a reminder letter, maybe from their mom, or from their husband, of what to get from the store.

National Archaeology Day takes place on October 20th at the ROM and many other museums around the world!